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20 Brexit Conversations We Wish Would End

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    HAYSIEHAYSIE Member Posts: 33,193

    Oh the irony.

    Brexit’s Broken Promises: 19 Lies That Failed to Materialize



    Remember when Brexit was sold as a straightforward, win-win situation? As it turns out, the road to Brexit was paved with not-so-good intentions and a fair share of outright fibs. The campaign was a masterclass in misinformation, selling Britons a basket of more fictional promises than a Sunday night drama. Now, with the benefit of hindsight, how many of these myths have you spotted unravelling at the seams?


    1. £350 Million a Week to the NHS

    The famous bus promise—£350 million a week for the NHS. In reality, that money, much like our European friendships, seems to have evaporated. Instead, we’ve spent billions on Brexit preparations, making that bus more of a phantom coach driven by ghosts of promises past.


    2. Easy Trade Deals

    Quick and easy trade deals were promised as soon as we left. Fast forward, and those deals are either underwhelming or still under negotiation. It seems ‘quick and easy’ was code for ‘slow and frustrating.’


    3. The Irish Border Issue

    “It’ll be fine,” they said. “No hard border,” they promised. Fast forward to customs checks and protocol disputes—turns out, geopolitics is a bit more complicated than a slogan on a leaflet.


    4. Turkey Joining the EU

    The fear-mongering about Turkey joining the EU soon and flooding the UK with migrants turned out to be baseless. Not only is Turkey no closer to joining the EU, but the discussion is off the table entirely. This was scaremongering on steroids with a geopolitical twist.


    5. No Downside to Brexit

    Remember hearing there would be no downside to Brexit, only a “considerable upside”? The economy begs to differ, having been considerably downsized instead. The only upside seems to be in the increase in bureaucracy and export challenges.


    6. Maintaining the Status Quo with the EU

    Some thought we could maintain all the benefits of EU membership while blocking all the drawbacks. Reality check: you can’t have your cake and eat it, especially if it’s stuck at customs awaiting import clearance.


    7. Immediate Economic Benefits

    The immediate economic benefits of Brexit are still missing, much like logic in the original campaign. The pound slumped, investment cooled, and the financial forecast is as stable as a three-legged chair.


    8. Boost for Fishermen

    British fishermen were supposed to thrive post-Brexit. Instead, they’re drowning in red tape and lost European markets. It appears ‘sovereignty’ over waters doesn’t equate to selling fish freely.


    9. Strengthened Union of the UK

    Brexit was supposed to strengthen the UK’s union. Instead, Scotland is eyeing independence more keenly, and Northern Ireland is navigating a sea of protocol issues. So much for unity!


    10. Sunlit Uplands

    The promise of “sunlit uplands” feels more like stumbling in the dark. Economic forecasts are grim, and the political landscape is as stormy as ever. Those uplands now seem more like a mirage, visible only to the most optimistic or deluded.


    11. More Jobs for Brits

    “We’ll see a surge in jobs for Brits,” they claimed. Yet, with sectors from farming to healthcare struggling without their EU workforce, the job market is as shaky as ever. Seems like we might need more than just British grit to fill these gaps.


    12. NHS Staffing Levels

    Brexit was argued to help control NHS staffing. Instead, we’re grappling with shortages as EU nationals leave the healthcare sector. Another case of ‘be careful what you wish for.’


    13. Protecting British Culture

    Protecting British culture from the EU’s influence sounded grand. But what was under threat? It turns out the cultural exchange was more beneficial, and now it’s restricted. Who knew opera and cheese were so offensive?


    14. Freedom to Make Our Laws

    Free from the shackles of EU law, we could finally make our own decisions—except now we spend half our time trying to align new laws with those we just escaped, to keep trade flowing. Irony much?


    15. Reducing Red Tape

    Cutting down on red tape was a headline act. In an unexpected plot twist, businesses now navigate more paperwork than ever before to trade with the EU. Turns out, red tape breeds faster than rabbits.


    16. Sovereignty Equals Power

    Reclaiming sovereignty was meant to restore Britain’s control over its fate. Instead, it’s shown just how interconnected and dependent we are on our neighbours. Isolation might be sovereignty, but it’s lonely at the top—or in this case, out on a limb.


    17. Enhancing Security

    Leaving the EU was supposed to enhance our security. Yet, we find ourselves excluded from real-time security alerts and databases. It’s like choosing to leave the neighbourhood watch because you don’t like the coordinator.


    18. No Impact on Expats

    The millions of Brits living in the EU wouldn’t be affected, they said. Now, many face residency issues, healthcare headaches, and a mountain of bureaucracy. Paradise lost, indeed.


    19. Food Prices Would Remain Stable

    Finally, food prices were supposed to remain stable. Instead, we’re navigating increased costs and occasional shortages. Brexit diet, anyone?


    The Brexit Hall of Mirrors

    So, as we wander through the Brexit hall of mirrors, every misshapen reflection reveals another distorted truth. Was it all worth it? As we stumble from one mishap to another, it’s becoming increasingly hard to see the exit—quite literally. Who’s ready to navigate this labyrinth for another decade?


    https://www.msn.com/en-gb/money/other/brexit-s-broken-promises-19-lies-that-failed-to-materialize/ss-BB1lXTql?ocid=msedgntp&pc=NMTS&cvid=6ebcf6e086af43569550f6eb8a6223d2&ei=63#image=1
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    EssexphilEssexphil Member Posts: 8,346
    edited May 9
    We really need to concentrate on utilising resources to deal with the real world. Not harking back to pre-2016 as though it was some sort of Golden Era.

    Why on earth does the Nuffield Trust have a "Brexit programme lead"? Surely the only possible relevance to such a role would be to deal with problems-not pontificate.

    What next? "If only we'd won the Battle of Hastings" says our "Life was better before the Normans" lead.

    We are 1 of the largest economies in the World. Instead of whining about what used to be, how about taking real steps in the real world we really live in? Because Big Pharma do not care 2 hoots about the EU or Brexit-just money. It's as though being in or out of Europe changes the simple rules of market forces and profit.

    PS-rubbish excuse of the week. Some play bombed in London, and closed after about half a performance. And the writer said it was the fault of Brexit

    PPS. The non-EU excuse of the week. That eejit who owns a quarter of Man Utd has declared that the 2 main problems at Man Utd are the IT Department is a bit untidy, and that some staff are working from home. So wasting £hundreds of millions on terrible players and a Manager totally out of his depth aren't more pressing priorities?

    Rant over :)
  • Options
    HAYSIEHAYSIE Member Posts: 33,193
    Essexphil said:

    We really need to concentrate on utilising resources to deal with the real world. Not harking back to pre-2016 as though it was some sort of Golden Era.

    Why on earth does the Nuffield Trust have a "Brexit programme lead"? Surely the only possible relevance to such a role would be to deal with problems-not pontificate.

    What next? "If only we'd won the Battle of Hastings" says our "Life was better before the Normans" lead.

    We are 1 of the largest economies in the World. Instead of whining about what used to be, how about taking real steps in the real world we really live in? Because Big Pharma do not care 2 hoots about the EU or Brexit-just money. It's as though being in or out of Europe changes the simple rules of market forces and profit.

    PS-rubbish excuse of the week. Some play bombed in London, and closed after about half a performance. And the writer said it was the fault of Brexit

    PPS. The non-EU excuse of the week. That eejit who owns a quarter of Man Utd has declared that the 2 main problems at Man Utd are the IT Department is a bit untidy, and that some staff are working from home. So wasting £hundreds of millions on terrible players and a Manager totally out of his depth aren't more pressing priorities?

    Rant over :)

    Have you seen The Shield?
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    EssexphilEssexphil Member Posts: 8,346
    More blaming Brexit for our failures. Forget the Headline-and read the article.

    We had terrible water quality while we were in the EU. And, in news that will surprise no-one, we still do.

    The EU has Laws in relation to this. And-guess what? So do we. The Environment Act. As mentioned in the article.

    We are not spending the money required. Neither are the Water Companies.

    We need to stop blaming Brexit for everything. Who cares whether it is EU Laws or UK Laws that we are failing to meet?
  • Options
    HAYSIEHAYSIE Member Posts: 33,193
    Essexphil said:

    We really need to concentrate on utilising resources to deal with the real world. Not harking back to pre-2016 as though it was some sort of Golden Era.

    Why on earth does the Nuffield Trust have a "Brexit programme lead"? Surely the only possible relevance to such a role would be to deal with problems-not pontificate.

    What next? "If only we'd won the Battle of Hastings" says our "Life was better before the Normans" lead.

    We are 1 of the largest economies in the World. Instead of whining about what used to be, how about taking real steps in the real world we really live in? Because Big Pharma do not care 2 hoots about the EU or Brexit-just money. It's as though being in or out of Europe changes the simple rules of market forces and profit.

    PS-rubbish excuse of the week. Some play bombed in London, and closed after about half a performance. And the writer said it was the fault of Brexit

    PPS. The non-EU excuse of the week. That eejit who owns a quarter of Man Utd has declared that the 2 main problems at Man Utd are the IT Department is a bit untidy, and that some staff are working from home. So wasting £hundreds of millions on terrible players and a Manager totally out of his depth aren't more pressing priorities?

    Rant over :)

    I am surprised that Man U havent replaced their manager.

    I only posted the Broken Promises to give leave voters on the forum the opportunity to revisit the ones they fell for.

    The problem with Brexit is that it will not end anytime soon.
    As the recent asylum seeker problem in Ireland has shown.

    There are still being problems encountered over medicines etc.
    The new customs checks will cause further problems, when we are finally able to implement them.
  • Options
    HAYSIEHAYSIE Member Posts: 33,193
    Essexphil said:

    More blaming Brexit for our failures. Forget the Headline-and read the article.

    We had terrible water quality while we were in the EU. And, in news that will surprise no-one, we still do.

    The EU has Laws in relation to this. And-guess what? So do we. The Environment Act. As mentioned in the article.

    We are not spending the money required. Neither are the Water Companies.

    We need to stop blaming Brexit for everything. Who cares whether it is EU Laws or UK Laws that we are failing to meet?

    Well that I suppose is one interpretation of the article.
  • Options
    EssexphilEssexphil Member Posts: 8,346
    HAYSIE said:

    Essexphil said:

    More blaming Brexit for our failures. Forget the Headline-and read the article.

    We had terrible water quality while we were in the EU. And, in news that will surprise no-one, we still do.

    The EU has Laws in relation to this. And-guess what? So do we. The Environment Act. As mentioned in the article.

    We are not spending the money required. Neither are the Water Companies.

    We need to stop blaming Brexit for everything. Who cares whether it is EU Laws or UK Laws that we are failing to meet?

    Well that I suppose is one interpretation of the article.
    You remind me of a German HR Professional I once worked with.

    She loved the UK. But delighted in poking fun at our attitude to the EU.

    Her point was that it is always the British who are up in arms about this EU law, and that EU law. And railing against everything-as though the UK was the only country that mattered.

    She always loved the German approach. Which was to always publicly defend every EU law. While quietly ignoring any that didn't suit...:)
  • Options
    HAYSIEHAYSIE Member Posts: 33,193
    edited May 9
    Essexphil said:

    HAYSIE said:

    Essexphil said:

    More blaming Brexit for our failures. Forget the Headline-and read the article.

    We had terrible water quality while we were in the EU. And, in news that will surprise no-one, we still do.

    The EU has Laws in relation to this. And-guess what? So do we. The Environment Act. As mentioned in the article.

    We are not spending the money required. Neither are the Water Companies.

    We need to stop blaming Brexit for everything. Who cares whether it is EU Laws or UK Laws that we are failing to meet?

    Well that I suppose is one interpretation of the article.
    You remind me of a German HR Professional I once worked with.

    She loved the UK. But delighted in poking fun at our attitude to the EU.

    Her point was that it is always the British who are up in arms about this EU law, and that EU law. And railing against everything-as though the UK was the only country that mattered.

    She always loved the German approach. Which was to always publicly defend every EU law. While quietly ignoring any that didn't suit...:)
    My Grandad was German.
    This another view.


    The Guardian previously revealed that ministers planned to stop assessing waterways under the WFD and were instead using a new, as--yet-undisclosed methodology, which campaigners fear will not be as rigorous.

    Charles Watson, the founder of the water campaign group River Action, said, “Today’s OEP’s assessment makes grim reading for our rivers and is a damning vote of no confidence in Defra’s and the EA’s ability to deliver on their statutory objectives to bring the majority of our water bodies to ‘good’ ecological condition by 2027.

    “With almost all our rivers failing ecologically, it is shocking to read the OEP’s conclusion that current government plans are clearly woefully inadequate to address this environmental crisis.

    “We fully echo the OEP’s demands that the secretary of state pulls put his finger out and takes urgent action to develop additional, specific, time bound and fully funded measures to address the dire condition of our rivers”.

    This seems to be the governments bs response.

    “We fully echo the OEP’s demands that the secretary of state pulls put his finger out and takes urgent action to develop additional, specific, time bound and fully funded measures to address the dire condition of our rivers”.

    A government spokesperson said: “We welcome this report’s recommendations to go further and will consider them in detail.

    “We are confident that the river basin management plans are compliant with the current regulations and we have already committed to reforming these plans and delivering tailored long-term proposals to improve all water bodies in England.

    “This is alongside our work to fast-track investment and hold water companies more accountable – including consulting on a ban on bonuses and bringing in a fourfold increase in inspections.”

    Yawn.


    Have you seen The Shield?
  • Options
    EssexphilEssexphil Member Posts: 8,346
    edited May 9
    No.

    Is it a political programme?

    Much like football, I am only allowed to watch them when my Wife is not in the room. Quite apart from the fact that she hates politics, she thinks I get a bit ranty...
  • Options
    HAYSIEHAYSIE Member Posts: 33,193
    Essexphil said:

    No.

    Is it a political programme?

    Much like football, I am only allowed to watch them when my Wife is not in the room. Quite apart from the fact that she hates politics, she thinks I get a bit ranty...

    No, have a look at the trailer on the other thread.
  • Options
    TheEdge949TheEdge949 Member Posts: 5,437
    Well my home river, The Trent, now boasts Trout, Grayling and Barbel. Three species that the river could not support when I was growing up.

    I guess some rivers have experienced an improvement in water quality.

    Something that was impossible as part of the EU. :D:D
  • Options
    HAYSIEHAYSIE Member Posts: 33,193

    Well my home river, The Trent, now boasts Trout, Grayling and Barbel. Three species that the river could not support when I was growing up.

    I guess some rivers have experienced an improvement in water quality.

    Something that was impossible as part of the EU. :D:D

    So this has suddenly occured since 2020?
  • Options
    HAYSIEHAYSIE Member Posts: 33,193

    Well my home river, The Trent, now boasts Trout, Grayling and Barbel. Three species that the river could not support when I was growing up.

    I guess some rivers have experienced an improvement in water quality.

    Something that was impossible as part of the EU. :D:D

    Oops.

    Marked water quality improvements
    The River Trent in England is a good example. Once one of the most polluted rivers in the UK, it has shown marked water quality improvements which have been well documented by chemical and biological monitoring results spanning more than six decades.
    The Unnatural History of the River Trent: 50 Years of Ecological ...
    onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/9781119961819.ch21
    onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/9781119961819.ch21

    Marked water quality improvements
    The River Trent in England is a good example. Once one of the most polluted rivers in the UK, it has shown marked water quality improvements which have been well documented by chemical and biological monitoring results spanning more than six decades.
    The Unnatural History of the River Trent: 50 Years of Ecological ...
    onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/9781119961819.ch21
    onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/9781119961819.ch21

    Global web icon
    Wiley Online Library
    https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/9781119961819.ch21
    The Unnatural History of the River Trent: 50 Years of Ecological ...
    WEB17 Feb 2012 · The River Trent in England is a good example. Once one of the most polluted rivers in the UK, it has shown marked water quality improvements which have been well …
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    TheEdge949TheEdge949 Member Posts: 5,437
    HAYSIE said:

    Well my home river, The Trent, now boasts Trout, Grayling and Barbel. Three species that the river could not support when I was growing up.

    I guess some rivers have experienced an improvement in water quality.

    Something that was impossible as part of the EU. :D:D

    So this has suddenly occured since 2020?
    Wow I'm a great fisherman. 1 cast, 1 bite. Reel them in.

    Satire my dear boy satire.
  • Options
    HAYSIEHAYSIE Member Posts: 33,193

    Well my home river, The Trent, now boasts Trout, Grayling and Barbel. Three species that the river could not support when I was growing up.

    I guess some rivers have experienced an improvement in water quality.

    Something that was impossible as part of the EU. :D:D

    Global web icon
    The Guardian
    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/article/2024/may/09/en
    England’s rivers to remain in poor state as EU laws ignored post
    WEB9 hours ago · When Britain was a member of the EU, the government was required to follow the water framework directive (WFD), standards for waterways that have been credited with cleaning up Europe’s dirty water.

    Other content from theguardian.com
    England to diverge from EU water monitoring standards
    EA head signals desire to change rule that exposes extent of river ...
    See more

    Global web icon
    Financial Times
    https://www.ft.com/content/24ab43b9-b62b-46ea-903b-305d43e6c
    Ministers have failed to implement laws on water quality in
    WEB14 hours ago · Ministers have failed to implement laws designed to improve the quality of rivers, lakes and coastal waters in England, the post-Brexit environmental watchdog has

    Global web icon
    The Guardian
    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2023/oct/27/england-to
    England to diverge from EU water monitoring standards
    WEBFri 27 Oct 2023 05.02 EDT. The UK government is to diverge from the EU’s standards for monitoring water quality in England, it can be revealed. Campaigners fear the change of …

    Author: Helena Horton
    Global web icon
    BBC
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-68977720
    OEP watchdog criticises government's water clean-up plans for …
    WEB12 hours ago · The government's efforts to clean up England's rivers, lakes and seas have been criticised by a key environmental watchdog as "poor". The Office for Environmental

    Global web icon
    theguardian.com
    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2024/jan/19/brexit-diver
    Brexit divergence from EU destroying UK’s vital environmental ...
    WEB20 Jan 2024 · The Guardian analysed data from the Institute for European Environmental Policy (IEEP), which has been tracking divergences in environmental law since the UK left the EU, and for the first...

    Well my home river, The Trent, now boasts Trout, Grayling and Barbel. Three species that the river could not support when I was growing up.

    I guess some rivers have experienced an improvement in water quality.

    Something that was impossible as part of the EU. :D:D

    Seems a bit of a Polish coal, or straight banana story.
  • Options
    HAYSIEHAYSIE Member Posts: 33,193

    HAYSIE said:

    Well my home river, The Trent, now boasts Trout, Grayling and Barbel. Three species that the river could not support when I was growing up.

    I guess some rivers have experienced an improvement in water quality.

    Something that was impossible as part of the EU. :D:D

    So this has suddenly occured since 2020?
    Wow I'm a great fisherman. 1 cast, 1 bite. Reel them in.

    Satire my dear boy satire.
    Or bs.
  • Options
    TheEdge949TheEdge949 Member Posts: 5,437
    Seems to be a sound and erudite synopsis of the current situation. Balanced journalism on the subject of Brexit. Not sure that's a genuine Haysie post.
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